Alison Gopnik
homepage:http://www.alisongopnik.com/
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Description

Alison Gopnik is a professor of psychology and affiliate professor of philosophy at the University of California at Berkeley. She received her BA from McGill University and her PhD. from Oxford University. She is an internationally recognized leader in the study of children’s learning and development and was the first to argue that children’s minds could help us understand deep philosophical questions. She was also one of the founders of the field of “theory of mind”, and more recently introduced the idea that probabilistic models and Bayesian inference could be applied to children’s learning. She is the author or coauthor of over 100 journal articles and several books including “Words, thoughts and theories” MIT Press, 1997, and the bestselling and critically acclaimed popular books “The Scientist in the Crib” William Morrow, 1999, and “The Philosophical Baby; What children’s minds tell us about love, truth and the meaning of life” Farrar, Strauss and Giroux, 2009. She has also written widely about cognitive science and psychology for Science, The New York Times, Scientific American, The Times Literary Supplement, The New York Review of Books, New Scientist and Slate, among others. And she has frequently appeared on TV and radio including “The Charlie Rose Show” and “The Colbert Report”. She has three sons and lives in Berkeley, California with her husband Alvy Ray Smith.


Lectures:

invited talk
flag The Philosophical Baby - What Children´s Minds Tell Us About Truth, Love, and the Meaning of Life
as author at  28th Conference on Uncertainty in Artificial Intelligence (UAI), Catalina Islands 2012,
201 views
  lecture
flag Childhood Is Evolution’s Way of Performing Simulated Annealing: A life history perspective on explore-exploit tensions
as author at  2nd Multidisciplinary Conference on Reinforcement Learning and Decision Making (RLDM), Edmonton 2015,
85 views